Christian Thompson
(London)

Christian Thompson has trained formally in sculpture, but over the years his work has edged closer to what he describes as “real time” covering photography, video and live performance. In 2008 he was one of 10 artists to be accepted into DasArts Advanced Studies in Performance in Amsterdam and gained a Master of Theatre from the Amsterdam School of Arts. Thompson has performed his solo work internationally.

Performance art is –
“Essentially, it is time-based art that is enacted live, sometimes with or without audience participation. I think the disciplines have merged much more, for example, video art is now more like film; performance art is more like theatre and theatre is more like dance.”

Ask me about –
“I would suggest thinking more visually and outside of traditional narrative- based forms of theatre. Bring yourself and your own experiences to the work.”

Clark Beaumont
Comprised of Sarah Clark and Nicole Beaumont
(Brisbane)

Starting off as strangers in 2010, artist duo Clark Beaumont was only meant to collaborate on one artwork. Instead, the pair became increasingly enthralled with one another in their dialogue and the collaborative process. Clark Beaumont’s artistic investigations examine identity construction, communication and interpersonal relationships. Through performance and video, the duo experiments with multiple feminine personas and characters to recreate and reflect on their own individual experiences.

Performance art is –
“Using humans in art creates a more immediate and powerful connection between the viewer and the work, because its medium is instantly relatable and infinitely complex. Performance art is visceral and surreal.”

Ask us about –
“Throughout the residency, we invite the viewer to engage with us and our work in any way that feels appropriate.”

Frances Barrett
(Sydney)

Frances Barrett’s practice takes the form of body-based live acts, endurance performance and sonic experimentation. She has been involved in the Sydney arts community for many years as a member of an artistic collaboration entitled the Brown Council, as a host of local FBi Radio arts show Canvas and as co-director of artist-run-initiative, Serial Space. Barrett’s work is informed by queer and feminist theories and methodologies, and draws from the history of performance art practice.

Performance art is –
“Performance art is a dynamic and responsive art form. In every moment of a performance there is a constant negotiation between the artist, audience, time, space and embodiment.”

Ask me about –
“Revolutions, flagging, collaboration, queer theory, radio, temazepam, manifestos, BDSM, feminism, occupation, The Simpsons, comedy and freestyle wrestling.”

George (Poonkhin) Khut
(Sydney)

George Khut started working with interactive media and participatory art in 2002, when he began his doctoral research into participant-centred biofeedback (a technique used to learn to control your body’s functions) artworks. This research was, and continues to be, driven by an interest in body-focused practices that facilitate a way of feeling and being present to our situation as subjects. Khut’s involvement in live art and performance and participatory art comes from this interest in bodily ways of knowing and learning, through participation.

Performance art is –
“Performance art is all about physical and psychological presence of the ‘performer’. I prefer ‘live art’. For me, this is a more inclusive framework for attending to living processes, live networks and situations.”

Ask me about –
“Connections between the body, art, health and cosmology. I’m searching for ways to extend our experience of embodiment and selfhood into larger ecological, planetary, and multiversal frameworks – to explore what insights these deeper perspectives on time, space, matter and evolution might afford us in our attempts to address the profoundly unsustainable nature of our contemporary globalised economy.”

Lottie Consalvo
(Newcastle)

Painting was Lottie Consalvo’s primary discipline until she befriended an incredible singer-songwriter. She decided music was the most powerful form of expression but sadly couldn't sing. It was Marina Abramović’s work that inspired her to view performance in an art context. Consalvo’s work considers adolescence and she believes that her practice is an extension of personal diary entries, drawings, poetry and love songs.

Performance art is –
“My thoughts on performance art constantly shift. Sometimes I consider it to be the most direct medium, other times I think that is the most removed.”

Ask me about –
“During the residency I will be developing my second ‘life performance’, where for one year I will live out my desires. We could start here.”

Nat Abbott
(Melbourne)

Natt Abbott is a choreographer and performer who uses endurance-based practices to uncover the durability of the human body in performance. She trained in ballet and contemporary dance but over the years has become more interested in the untrained body. Abbott is excited by the potential of failure or fault and in attempting impossible things – like unison movement and synchronicity.

Performance art is –
“Somewhat mysterious to me. I think it speaks of time and place in a way that no other form can quite capture. It is of that moment and specific to that person or group of people.”

Ask me about –
“Vulnerability in performance, the impossibility of unison and the potential within the concept of repetition.”

Nicola Gunn
(Melbourne)

Nicola Gunn is a writer, director, performer and designer. Her work combines text, choreography and visual art and is made in response to the impulse to tell a story. She finds parallels between personal experiences and larger social realities, using subversive humour to address themes of identity and transformation in both the social and individual realms. Gunn believes that the idea of art demands and deserves to be renewed and re-imagined over time.

Performance art is –
“Conceptual action. Is it becoming more popular and less political? I don't think it is changing in this way, but this is perhaps something we will discover at the residency. How the politics have changed and how our artistic response has evolved.”

Ask me about –
“I really can’t answer this at this stage. It is generally the nature of my work to not know what I’m doing until I’m doing it. Perhaps people can bring me food? I have no idea whether I will be allowed to have a break during exhibition hours and I might get hungry.”

Sarah-Jane Norman
(Germany, the UK and Australia)

Sarah-Jane Norman has been producing solo performance work for 10 years. She specialises in durational pieces, lasting anywhere from six to 24 hours. Norman’s work unites performance, text, sculpture, video and sound, but the body remains at the core of her artistic practice. She is interested in making political questions visceral and combining them with the potential of the live encounter, to unlock questions we otherwise would not know how to ask.

Performance art is –
“I work at the interstices between disciplines in an effort to develop new performance vocabularies. I engage risky propositions towards uncertain outcomes. This apparently makes me a performance artist.”

Ask me about –
“Anything. There are no stupid questions. I’m shy but I do like a yarn.”

Sarah Rodigari
(Sydney)

In high school Sarah Rodigari read Brecht alongside Lilli Tomlin. At university it was Beckett and Sienfeld. For years she appropriated literature into corporeal mime – Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Cixous, Barthes. She studied sociology and prefers to focus on the audience in her performance work. Thus far in her career, Rodigari has compromised comfort, security and loved ones. She has performed within a number of Australian organisations and institutions including PACT, Performance Space, Arts House, Alaska Projects, Field Theory and many more.

Performance Art is –
“A historical definition of a certain type of art that developed in the ‘60s that was body-based. Nowadays, performance can be many things; it is a medium that refuses to settle.”

Ask me about –
“Ask me anything you like. My attention is all yours. Or, if you’re feeling shy, we don’t have to talk, we can just hang out, keep each other company.”

zin
Comprised of Harriet Gillies and Roslyn Helper
(Sydney)

zin is the artist partnership of Harriet Gillies and Roslyn Helper. Gillies and Helper met at Sydney University in 2009 and liked each other’s ideas and decided to make collaborative art under the title The (Puppy Eating His Birthday Steak) Players. Helper then went to New York to study political art at Tisch, NYU and Gillies went to NIDA to study directing. Both artists absorbed these new influences and continued to discuss ideas, reincarnating as zin, which means “sense” in Dutch. Their recent work has traversed many different forms, including small-scale one-on-one performances and large-scale politically themed immersive parties.

Performance art is –
“Performance art for us is an opportunity for both artists and audiences to engage with each other through action and dialogue, to explore and challenge familiar social and political conventions in new and interesting ways. The possibilities are endless, really.”

Ask us about –
“Why we make interactive performance-based work. What it’s like to work as a partnership. What our skin-care regimens are. Who are we wearing.”

Marina Abramović: In Residence is at Pier 2/3 June 24–July 5. Broadsheet is a proud media partner of Kaldor Public Art Projects in presenting Marina Abramović: In Residence.

kaldorartprojects.org.au