Right now, Western Australia is blooming. The state, which is home to more than 12,000 wildflowers species, is being blanketed by a rainbow of floral displays – from the red and dusty deserts of the goldfields, to the wheatbelt and southern coastal spots. Wildflower season starts in June in the north of the state before stretching southward until November. So, it’s the perfect time to catch these exuberant blooms. Here are six trails to try.

Esperance Wildflower Trail (7 to 10 days, return)
Head south-east to Fitzgerald River National Park, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve and home to roughly 20 per cent of WA’s plant species. The park is one of the world’s most diverse botanical regions, with 1800 plant species including royal hakea, qualap bell, sepulcralis, weeping gum, pincushion hakea, woolly banksia and bottlebrush . While you’re in the region, visit Cape Le Grand National Park. Here, you’ll find pristine coastlines and granite peaks plus plant species like Banksia speciosa and Banksia pulchella. Another stand-out spot is Dryandra Woodland where you’ll find golden dryandra, prickly lambertia, purple tangled grevillea, or the pink and yellow rainbows and orchids.
Best months: September to November

Goldfields Wildflower Trail (7 days return)
The goldfields wildflower trail stretches to Kalgoorlie-Boulder via Merredin in the state’s east. Along the way, woodlands, sand plains and historical gold rush towns are now decorated by a carpet of wildflowers. The Great Western Woodlands is another key spot to view the local blooms – be sure to look out for splendid everlastings or painted featherflower. While spring is the perfect time to head out, seasonal weather conditions can affect wildflower displays, so plan your trip using a travel times and distance chart like this one and check with local visitor centres for their advice on where to go for maximum wildflower joy.
Best months: August to October

Wave Rock Wildflower Trail (3 to 5 days return)
Just an hour out of Perth in York, you’ll find colourful flowers like mouse ears, damperia, donkey orchids and pygmy sundew. Nature reserves and walking trails can be found in towns along the trail where you can experience more wildflower spottings. Further on, Hyden (your end point) is home to WA’s famous Wave Rock, along with about 2500 species of wildflower trees from sheoaks and salmon gum to mulla-mulla.
Best months: August to October

Wheatbelt Winery and Woodlands Trail (3 days return)
This wildflower trail road trip leads you through the Wheatbelt wineries stretching from Perth to Wagin. Along the way, you can explore the rich conservation area of Tutanning Reserve before you head to Harrismith where the local wildflowers are in season. As you head to Narrogin, you can explore the wildflower trail at Foxes Lair. Boronia Reserve in Wagin is another wildflower hotspot.
Best months: September to November

Everlasting Wildflower Trail (3 to 5 days return)
If you’re looking for a never-ending carpet of wildflowers across WA’s desert expanse, go north along the Indian Ocean Drive. This wildflower trail road trip is the jewel in WA’s wildflower crown. From Perth, you head to Cervantes and Jurien Bay then Leeman. The start of your journey will take you through banksia woodland then red gums and kangaroo paw. Lesueur National Park is home to species including honey bush, starflower and lesueur hakeas. As you venture further to Mullewa, you’ll be greeted by colourful carpets of everlastings. Finish in Geraldton for more wildflower displays.
Best months: June to September

Granite Loop Wildflower trail (3 to 5 days return)
Take the Granite Loop from Toodyay to Wongan Hills, two hours north-east of Perth. In Wongan Hills, visit Reynoldson’s Flora Reserve which is home to 1400 plant species – 24 of which are unique to the area. See kangaroo paw and everlastings plus cowslip orchids and triggerplant. Don’t forget to be on the look-out for granite rock formations such as those at Billycatting Rock.
Best months: September to November

On your wildflower trail road trip, remember:
• Picking wildflowers is illegal and you can be fined up to $2000
• Don’t trespass onto private property
• Avoid spreading disease ¬– stay out of any canola fields

For full itineraries, extra local information and map downloads, visit the Road Trip Country website. You can also view the Wildflower Tracker