The Guilford Hotel

Chips covered in rosemary salt and Keen’s curry mayo? Check. Beer garden? Check. Ambience? Yes. Welcome to The Guildford, a 131-year-old two-storey pub of original exposed brick, repurposed timber and brass finishes. Re-opened in 2016 after the building burned down back in 2008, this grand watering hole on James Street in Guildford offers more than 18 beers on tap, including White Rabbit Dark Ale and Little Creatures Pilsner and Pale Ale. Large groups can even order their own four-litre keg to avoid return trips to the bar.

The Guilford

Alabama Song

Alabama Song at Northbridge Social is a cosy, small bar that feels delightfully walled-off from the outside world. With taxidermy-adorned walls, subtle mood lighting and Chesterfield leather booths, Alabama Song’s interior has a cabin-like vibe and Deep South feel. A range of canned beers are available, as is a basket of good ol’ fashioned rockabilly tunes, nuts and hot n’ tasty chips with or without guacamole.

Alabama Song

The Dominion League

Beaufort Street bar The Dominion League pays homage to a dedicated group of Western Australians who campaigned for the secession of WA from the Federal Government in the 1930s. Its red-bricked walls are plastered with campaign posters, there’s slogan coasters on each table and a resident black swan (“Swannie”) perched on the bar. Dominion League offers a rotating collection of speciality beer on tap, as voted by the bar’s loyal customers. Beyond the beer, the bar’s options for fries include hand-cut chips with sage salt and tequila sage mayo, or an in-house take on poutine featuring chilli beef fries with cheese and jalapenos.

The Dominion League

Lucky Shag Waterfront Bar

An oldie but a goodie, the Lucky Shag has been a riverside go-to since it was first established in 1998. Part of the Old Perth Port development, the Shag has an outdoor decked boardwalk; an upper storey looking out over the ocean; acoustic music and comedy nights; and simple-but-satisfying pub grub. Example: polenta chips served with aioli; poutine topped with cheese and red-wine gravy; plus a straight-up bag of chips with tomato sauce. Sometimes that’s all you want to accompany a range of craft beer choices that include James Squire 150 Lashes and Little Creatures Pale and Rogers on tap, or Little Creatures Pilsner and Little Creatures IPA; Nail Red Ale; White Rabbit; Young Henrys; Feral Warhog; and James Squire Chancer from the fridge.

Lucky Shag

Miss Kitty’s Saloon 

Genuine poutine is hard to come by. One place that does it authentically and deliciously is Miss Kitty’s Saloon. Just like the traditional Canadian original, Miss Kitty’s poutine features crispy chips coated in rich brown gravy and, the pièce de résistance: cheese curds. Miss Kitty’s also offers roasted sweet potato fingers with smoked chipotle mayo as a “lighter” option, plus a range of bottled beers such as White Rabbit and Rogers. With décor featuring wooden pallet walls, mismatched grand chairs and swinging saloon doors, this is as west as you can get.

Miss Kitty’s Saloon

The National Hotel

A restored gem, The National has a prime location in the heart of Fremantle. This double-storey pub features: a 60-seat alfresco area on High Street; a four-metre-high drinks wall; and a bar counter made from recycled railway sleepers. Behind the bar you’ll find a large selection of craft beers, including James Squire, White Rabbit, Eagle Bay Brewing, Feral and Matso’s. Head upstairs to find a spot along the verandah, or plonk yourself next to one of the restored fireplaces before ordering some of the crispy hand-cut chips with house-made aioli.

The National

Varsity Bar, Nedlands

This American-themed bar is a local favourite with uni students for obvious reasons; cheap beers, cheap food and free sport screenings teamed with pool tables, arcade machines and Jenga-type board games. Varsity Bar makes for one impressive squad HQ. Grab a pint and chow down a basket of loaded fries; cheesy, chilli, hog (pulled pork), beany (vegetarian) or Philly.

Varsity Bar

This article produced by Broadsheet in partnership with James Squire.