Updated March 29, 2021

With new cases of Covid-19 popping up periodically, rules about where people can go, what services are considered essential, and how many people can gather (if at all) in Australian cities can change rapidly.

Here’s a guide to what’s allowed where.

We’re updating this list as the situation changes in different states.

QLD
Greater Brisbane will go into a three-day lockdown from 5pm Monday March 29 until 5pm Thursday April 1.

The lockdown will apply to the Brisbane, Logan, Ipswich, Moreton and Redlands council areas. Find details on restrictions for areas outside these locations here.

Residents of greater Brisbane can leave home for the following four reasons only: for essential work, for exercise, to give or receive healthcare, to buy essential supplies.

Gatherings
In greater Brisbane no gatherings are permitted. There is a limit of two home visitors for giving or receiving support, and people are allowed to exercise in a family group or with one other person from a different family group (if social distancing is observed). Weddings can have a maximum of 10 guests, including celebrant and witnesses. And a maximum of 20 people can attend funerals.

In the rest of Queensland, gatherings in people’s homes are limited to 30 people.

Masks
You must carry a mask with you at all times during greater Brisbane’s lockdown and currently throughout all of Queensland. They must be worn indoors in places such as shopping centres, public transport, gyms (except during “strenuous exercise”) and hospitality venues. It’s recommended you wear a mask outdoors, too, if you can’t stay more than 1.5 metres from other people.

What’s open
You can find a list of non-essential services here.

In greater Brisbane, cafes, pubs and restaurants can do takeaway only. Bootcamps and personal training are restricted to two people outdoors (including the trainer), with physical distancing observed. Social sport is permitted, such as golf and tennis, limited to two people. Food markets and farmers markets can operate. Schools will be closed from Tuesday March 30 until Monday April 19, except for vulnerable children and children of essential workers.

In the rest of Queensland restaurants, cafes, bars and nightclubs can only open for seated eating and drinking, no standing allowed.

More information here

NSW
At 12.01am on Monday March 28, New South Wales’s Covid-19 restrictions were significantly relaxed.

Gatherings
There are no caps on the number of people you can have over to your home. If you have more than 100 people, you must have a Covid-19 safety plan and record visitor details.

The limit on outdoor gatherings has been lifted to 200 people.

The 300-person cap on weddings and funerals has been lifted. Now, you can have as many people as you like, as long as the event adheres to the two-square-metre rule.

Masks
There are no longer any public spaces where masks are compulsory. The state government does recommend, though, that commuters on peak-hour services, and those who can’t maintain social distancing in any setting, continue to mask up.

What’s open
Pretty much everything. You still need to check into shops and venues when you visit, sanitise your hands, and adhere to social-distancing rules.

Sporting and entertainment venues
Entertainment venues – including stadiums and theatres – are now permitted to return to 100 per cent seated capacity.

Find out more about changes to restrictions here.

VIC
At 6pm on Friday March 26, 2021, Victoria relaxed its Covid settings.

Gatherings
Up to 100 visitors to your home per day is allowed. The visitor cap includes dependants but not infants under 12 months old. There is no limit on the number of households those people can come from.

Up to 200 people can meet outdoors in a public place. The cap includes dependants but not infants under 12 months old. There is no limit on the number of households those people can come from.

Masks
Face masks must be worn on public transport, and in taxis and ride share vehicles. They are also mandatory on flights, in airports and when visiting hospitals. It is recommended Victorians wear a face mask at private gatherings or when a 1.5-metre distance from other people can’t be achieved.

What’s open
Pretty much everything. You still need to check into shops and venues when you visit, sanitise your hands, and adhere to social-distancing rules.

Sporting and entertainment venues
Seated venues (indoor and outdoor) and non-seated venues can be at 75 per cent capacity (with a maximum of 1000 people). Non-seated outdoor venues don’t have any caps.

There are no limits on the number of people who can be on dance floors. Density limits apply, though, depending on the venue type.

There are no caps on gym and exercise classes, and indoor physical recreation and community sports facilities must adhere to the one-person-per-two-square-metres rule.

More information here

SA
From 12.01 am Wednesday March 31, 2021, South Australia’s Covid restrictions change. The density requirement will move from one person per two square metres to three people per four square metres (equivalent to 75 per cent).

Gatherings
At private functions (including weddings and funerals) there is a cap of 200 people, with a maximum of one person per two square metres. Dancing is also permitted, but there are some restrictions.

You can have 50 people at your home, but if you have between 51 and 200 people over you must have a Covid-safe plan, appoint a Covid marshal and your guests must check in.

Masks
It is not mandatory to wear face masks in South Australia at the moment, but it is recommended when out in public if you can’t physically distance.

What’s open
Everything, but all businesses have to have a Covid-safe plan. And patrons must sanitise their hands and register/check-in when they enter the premises.

Sporting and entertainment venues
For cinemas, live theatre or any other live performance venues where patrons are in fixed seating, capacities can be at 75 per cent if patrons wear masks. For capacity at 50 per cent, masks are not required.

More information here

WA
The biggest thing to know about Covid restrictions in WA is that the two-square-metre rule reigns supreme. A capacity of 75 per cent at certain outdoor and indoor venues applies.

Gatherings
The total number of people at a gathering can’t exceed more than one person per two square metres.

Masks
A face mask is only mandatory at the airport and on an aircraft.

What’s open
Pretty much everything. Contact registers are mandatory at shops and venues when you visit. You also have to sanitise your hands and adhere to social-distancing rules.

Sporting and entertainment venues
There’s a capacity of up to 75 per cent at certain outdoor and indoor spaces, including some restaurants that offer fixed seating only (cafes, food courts and bars, for example). Also at 75 per cent capacity are outdoor seated entertainment spaces that have fixed seating, such as concert halls, cinemas and theatres.

Additional reporting by Che-Marie Trigg and Dani Frangos