Discovering a new cafe or coffee joint is one of life’s simple pleasures. The best hidden spots don’t always have the biggest online presence, though, and it can be hard to look past the hustle and bustle of the busiest cafes in the buzziest suburbs to seek out the singular gems.

We’ve put together a guide to some of Broadsheet’s favourite hidden and low-key cafes around the country that are worth a trip out of your neighbourhood.

Kurumac, Sydney
Kurumac sits in an old Marrickville shopfront, hiding in plain sight between a hairdresser and an old fruit and veg vendor. It’s a simple and unassuming family-run spot, known by locals as a Sydney go-to for Japanese comfort food and specialty coffee.

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It’s best to take a seat inside this beautiful, light-filled space to experience the menu as intended (although takeaway is also available). Breakfast and lunch choices include a pickled mustard and cod roe omelette, an eggplant katsu sandwich, and a spicy tuna tartare, among others. Not feeling like coffee? Maybe try the Mapo hojicha gelato milkshake instead.

Matilda, Melbourne
Located in an old milk bar in Mont Albert, a sleepy pocket of Melbourne’s north-east, Matilda has transformed these quaint old premises into a French-inspired cafe and corner store. Choose a seat at the large communal table, or under one of the bright yellow umbrellas outside.

Matilda’s menu boasts a variety of both sweet and savoury items, from butterscotch waffles and crumpets to an extensive list of bagels and sandwiches, with a good range of vegan and gluten-free dishes available too. You’ll want to bring your four-legged friend along for the ride too – there’s a special menu just for dogs, with puppy-chinos and toasted scraps on offer.

Florence, Brisbane
Nestled in the tree-lined streets of Camp Hill is Florence, a vision of white weatherboard charm serving up nourishing food to the residents of Brisbane’s southern suburbs. Occupying an old Queenslander corner shop, the inside has been entirely transformed into a gorgeous breakfast spot you’ll want to keep coming back to.

As for the menu, expect all-day breakfasts crafted from sustainably sourced produce; take-home house-made preserves, ferments and pickles; and local artisan coffee from Parallel Roasters. At Florence, the hardest decision you’ll face is whether to grab a cosy seat inside, or to enjoy your coffee with the sun outside.

Coffee in Common, Adelaide
Once a staple of Melbourne’s cafe scene, Coffee in Common moved to Adelaide (along with owners Sean Do and Davide Cavuoto) in 2019. It now sits in the industrial backstreets of Hindmarsh, in a massive, light-filled warehouse.

Using a Japanese-inspired minimalist approach, the interior of Coffee in Common has been designed for dedicated coffee nuts. Take a seat at the large bar and watch as two expert baristas carefully craft your morning brew, happy to answer any questions about single origins and blends as they go.

And if you have a sweet tooth, Coffee in Common has its own in-house pastry chef so you’ll be well taken care of with speciality doughnuts: varieties include a coffee-glaze and ganache, shaved carrot and walnut, and mixed-berry glaze with strawberries.

Folk and Merchant
Located in Perth’s beachside suburb of Doubleview, Folk and Merchant has made a big impact in the community since opening just on a year ago.

Coffee is at the heart of Folk and Merchant, with Kaltiva Coffee Roasters providing the cafe with a custom-made blend. For food, it’s a simple menu of toast, open sandwiches and croissants, and baked goods.

But it’s the additional offerings, all committed to supporting local businesses, which make this cafe stand out among the crowd. Customers can pick up relishes and jams from Oohlala Preserves, kombucha from Hippie Kombucha, clothes from Lucie June, and handmade ceramics, keep-cups and wooden art from Sarai Marie.

This article is produced by Broadsheet in partnership with MINI Countryman, 5 seater SUV designed to do everything a city dweller needs and more.