Tipico

Opening Soon

Features

licensed
Italian

Tipico, a new modern-Italian bistro, will open in Windsor next month run by Italian-born but Melbourne-based Andrea Da Como (D.O.C., Baby, Builders Arms Hotel) and Marco Scalisi (Ti Amo, Swillhouse Group, Tokyo Tina).

The pair – who began planning Tipico in May last year – met about six years ago while working on Lygon St, and bonded over after work drinks at late-night bar the Yacht Club.

“It reflects the new Italy, the Italy that’s now in Milan, the cool new vibe. Not the classic restaurant with Italian music paying and cloth on the tables,” Da Como says of his new venue, in a thick Italian accent.

“When people go to Italy now, people go to Milan. It’s the fashion capital, the coolest city in Italy,” continues Da Como.

During a trip to Milan in August last year Da Como recognised a similar culture in Melbourne and decided his “dream” project could work here: an edgy modern-Italian restaurant.

The flavours coming out of head chef Domenic De Marco’s kitchen will be relatively classic, but will see some modern finesse added to the plating. That doesn’t mean you’re going to see a deconstructed pizza though.

“I can’t picture it in my head. You might get a bowl of dough and a bowl of tomato next to it and whip up your own one,” Da Como says.

What you can expect to see alongside some classic pizzas are dishes like kingfish crudo, orange dressing and pink peppercorns; battered sardines with polenta chips; or spaghetti chitarra with vongole, mussels and calamari.

The wine list is going to stick to Italian and Victorian wines.

“We were born in Italy but now we live in Victoria, so let’s use products from here,” says Da Como. “It’s our country, our state now.”

The art-filled fit-out is being handled by Melbourne-based Swedish interior designer Stephanie Korolija (Studio Ole).

“She’s got new eyes, and new ideas, she’s a brand new studio,” says Da Como of Korolija, who he first met 10 years ago.

The walls will be hung with minimalist line-based works from London artist Meg Abbott.

“Italian people are a bit naughty. They’re fun, they’re cheeky so we decided to be a bit cheeky with the art.”