Glitter Veils wasn’t always Glitter Veils. Most recently plugging away on the Brisbane dream-pop scene under the moniker YOU, it was in July last year that Luke Zahnleiter and Michael Whitney (also of The Rational Academy and Nite Fields, respectively) were presented with a persuasive argument to change their band name.

Terrible Records got in touch. It was co-founded by Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor and is home to Solange, Twin Shadow, Blood Orange, Moses Sumney and Australia’s Kirin J. Callinan, among many others. Terrible suggested the switch to the more memorable and SEO-friendly moniker. It then went on to release Glitter Veils’ album, Figures in Sight, on its Flexible imprint, which focuses on unique debut releases.

After listening to the album it's easy to see why. Raw, abrasive, deep and mesmeric, the layers of sound play out like an experiment that may or may not reach a conclusion but will be a hell of a ride either way.

Zahnleiter and Whitney, champions of the album format, explain their processes and how they ended up on Terrible.

Broadsheet: Was putting Figures in Sight together a complex process?
Michael Whitney: It started off as a bedroom project for me, and then I wanted to play it live. Then Luke came along and we became really good friends. I guess from that initial period it was about two years of writing, recording, restructuring and going back and forth to the studio.

Luke Zahnleiter: We were pretty fastidious and got a bit obsessive in parts of it, but, overall, we're happy with how it came out and happy that the overall sound has been getting a good response. We're kind of relieved in a way.

BS: Was it important the album had an overall sound or feel?
LZ: Michael and I listen to similar music and we have quite a varied taste. I think it's about the feeling and mood we can create in the music. We could attempt to make a style of music, but [the album is] essentially what came out at that period in time. Whatever was impacting our life was funnelled through that.

MW: Luke and I come from pretty different spectrums of how we play instruments, and I think that is reflected in certain ways. The guitar has a similar sound over the whole album. I tend to like a lot of older pop music and stuff like [American composer] Angelo Badalamenti [best known for his work scoring David Lynch’s films].

BS: David Lynch is often mentioned in your reviews. How does that sit with you?
LZ: I'm happy with that. When people say “David Lynch”, I think they mean the Twin Peaks [theme] song [Falling]. I think it's more of a mood thing.

MW: That kind of tragic beauty.

BS: Describe the moment you heard Terrible was interested.
LZ: When we finished the album we had no idea what we were going to do from that stage. It's not like we had been playing live. We just got so involved in making the record that we didn't have a plan of attack afterwards. We just sent it to a bunch of labels – mainly international labels – and kind of hoped for the best. I emailed quite a few with some early mixes.

Then Ethan [Silverman] from Terrible emailed. It was very vague – I think it was a one-line response, something like: “This is cool, I'll sit on this ...”. Then three months later we heard from them again, and he got back to us with another vague message saying they wanted to put out two songs on the Flexible imprint, then we figured out a way to put everything out. We wanted to bypass plugging away at the local scene and getting on a local label.

BS: Why bypass the local route?
LZ: We wanted as many people as possible to hear the album – that's my main goal.

MW: We were sending it to labels that were probably above our heads, but we tried anyway. I just want to make really great albums. The live thing has almost been an afterthought with this last record.

LZ: We've both played in bands before and done local gigs and touring, and it's exhausting to do that, and you're not really getting much exposure. It's usually the same people who come to shows locally, and we just wanted to get a broader audience.

BS: How does it feel to have Solange, Twin Shadow and Blood Orange as labelmates?
MW: It's a great roster and I love Blood Orange and Solange's album. It's something to aspire to – to make albums in a certain way and to push us even further.

LZ: We're definitely in good company and it's a great label. I remember that Twin Shadow album from 2010 or 2011 – their first full-length. I used to love that album. To think we're now with the same company is a really good feeling. There are some great artists on Flexible, too.

BS: Any international touring plans?
LZ: We've got a few Melbourne shows coming up, but internationally, we'll see how it pans out. It's definitely something we'd both like to do, especially in America. Having Terrible on our side to help is a good position to be in.

Glitter Veils on Bandcamp