Whether you intend to roll out a swag in dense eucalypt forests or pitch an eight-person tent on a white-sand beach, there’s something for every camper in our diverse state. So pack the car and take a backcountry break this weekend.

Stringybark Campground
Stringybark Campground is in Deep Creek Conservation Park. A two-hour drive from Adelaide, Deep Creek is the largest slice of natural vegetation on the Fleurieu Peninsula. The forests of stringybark eucalyptus are home to emu-wrens, noisy black cockatoos and grey kangaroos that are likely to bound through your site in the mornings. Spend the day relaxing among nature or throw on your sneakers and hike to the secluded waterfalls and rocky coves. Bookings are essential and can only be made online through the Parks SA website.
Deep Creek Conservation Park, Boat Harbor Road, Deep Creek

Old Man Lake Campground
Old Man Lake is a fitting name for this sleepy campsite 12 kilometres out of Robe. The seven sites are sheltered and shaded, overlooking a small salt lake lined with dense coastal scrub. Walk along its banks and scope the footprints of wildlife that’s wandered there before you. Book ahead at the Parks SA website.
Little Dip Conservation Park, Nora Creina Road, Robe

Narrung Jetty Reserve
Narrung Jetty Reserve on the Coorong is a large open grass site – where Lake Alexandrina meets Lake Albert. Take a ferry across the Murray River to get there – it only lasts a few minutes but you’ll get a taste of the stunning view you’ll wake up to. (Tip: ask the ferry driver if they’re selling cheap firewood.) As darkness falls, head to the old lighthouse and view the night sky without any light pollution. Not only is Narrung Jetty Reserve a beautiful spot, it’s also free, so get in early or you’ll be pitching in ditches.
Alexandrina Drive, Narrung.

Western Kangaroo Island Campsite
Jump on the Sealink Ferry for a 45-minute crossing to Kangaroo Island. The Western Kangaroo Island Campsite sits alongside the popular Flinders Chase National Park, home to the Admirals Arch and Remarkable Rocks, and scenic secluded beaches such as Stokes Bay and Snellings Beach. The ferry ride could make a reasonable dent in your wallet (it’s $141 per person if you’re travelling with a vehicle) so we suggest spending some well-earned time here. The campsite also has four-star luxury pine log cabins – if you want to glamp up your island adventure.
7928 South Coast Road, Kingscote

Cable Bay Campground
Situated in Innes National Park, this natural oasis of mallee scrub and limestone cliffs is surrounded by rural farmland – rolling fields of barley and wheat. The pristine and secluded beaches are the perfect place to snorkel, surf and fish. The stunning coastlines make bushwalking a must: the West Cape Headland Hike offers 360-degree views of the coast from its lookout. You need to be self-sufficient at this campsite, so bring the basics along with a permit to camp.
Innes National Park, Bay Road, Inneston

Long Beach
Claim your own slice of white, sandy beach at Kingston’s Long Beach. With plenty of room to go around, the beach stretches more than 100 kilometres from Kingston SE to the Murray Mouth. There are plenty of places to pitch a tent, but we suggest setting up at the stretch of beach that lies in Kingston. The sand is firmer and will help to ensure your temporary dwelling doesn’t fall apart. Best of all, it’s free.
Long Beach, Kingston