Putting sausage to grill, surrounded by council-planned nature, is a birth-right for any Australian. It combines the best of camping and picnics: the ability to cook outdoors, but in close proximity to a supermarket should someone forget the tomato sauce.

We’ve tracked down some of the city’s best spots to drop a blanket, open a bottle of wine, and get your grill on.

Veale Gardens
South Terrace, Adelaide

Heading south of the city, Veale Gardens amps up the tranquillity of the usual park barbeque by including a waterfall, rose garden and greenhouse. It’s such a calm environment you’re likely to stumble across a Tai Chi class or spontaneous meditation session.

The lone-barbeque here is a classic, sturdy brick construction that’s seen its fair share of sausages.

Veale Gardens is right next to the tram if you want to hit the beach afterwards. It’s also adjacent to the Market Shed for emergency cheese, vegan treats and organic foodstuffs.

Veale Gardens

Victoria Park
Southeastern Parklands, Adelaide

A reliable staple of Adelaide’s Parkland barbeques. Facilities include a petanque court (similar to lawn bowls but on a gravel surface) and a training circuit for the eager exerciser, with a series of hurdles and a wooden log chained to bark chips in place of weights.

A recent redevelopment of the park’s racecourse and surrounds has resulted in some state-of-the-art public cooktops. The sleek units have a start/stop button and (for now) barely a grease stain – which makes them all the more appealing for that single origin taste.

The park’s picnic tables and chairs are artfully constructed out of metal but topped with stone to protect your rear from that scorching summer sun.

Victoria Park

Hazelwood Park
Davenport Terrace, Hazelwood Park

A fine specimen of suburban greenery, Hazelwood Park – next to the Burnside Swimming Centre – is the kind of park that would seem like its own world to a young mind. With sprawling trees and plenty of lush grass for a spot of cricket and/or a kick, this park is stuff of legend for anyone looking to stretch out.

The electric barbeques here are dotted around the park with a classic push-button start, half the fun of which is trying to work out whether or not it’s actually on. Tip: wait 30 seconds for a clicking sound and you’re good to go.

Hazelwood Park

BBQ Buoys
Casts off from Pinky Flat, War Memorial Drive

If you’ve ever felt frustrated by the fixed nature of barbeques … has BBQ Buoys got a solution for you.

The doughnut-shaped boats feature a working barbeque in the centre, allowing up to nine people to float down the River Torrens while cooking lunch, having a drink and listening to tunes on the optional Bluetooth speaker.

Beware of too much splashing – the potential horror of soggy bread runs beneath you at all times.

BBQ Buoys

Semaphore Foreshore
Esplanade and Semaphore Road, Semaphore

Park barbeques are not limited to the city, so nor should the food choice be limited to sausages. Adapt to your beachside surroundings and consider grilling some fish on the very same barbeque that’s sizzled thousands of sausages; it’ll give your fish some bite.

Semaphore’s barbeque facilities are right on the shoreline, where you’ll also find a 1930s carousel (Australia’s largest) made up of 40 hand-carved horses, steam-train rides operated by the National Railway Museum and, in the warmer months, Semaphore’s Summer Carnival with rides, water slides and mini golf overlooking the ocean.

Semaphore Foreshore

This article is presented in partnership with St Huberts’s new range of Victorian wines, The Stag, which includes chardonnay, shiraz and pinot noir.